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Full text of "Exhibition of sketches by the Mexican artist Diego M. Rivera: November the sixth through November the twenty-seventh, 1927."

EXHIBITION OF SKETCHES 
BY THE MEXICAN ARTIST 
DIEGO M. RIVERA 



« • • ••• ••• 



NOVEMBER THE SIXTH THROUGH 
NOVEMBER THE TWENTY-SEVENTH 

1927 



WORCESTER ART MUSEUM 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

c 




PORTRAIT 



CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION 

DIEGO M. RIVERA 

Both at home and abroad Diego M. Rivera is regarded by the 
critics and the cultivated public as well as the forceful leader in 
Mexican art. Alive to the tendencies of his time as embodied in 
the works of Cezanne, Seurat, and Signac, participating during an 
active period abroad in the several post-impressionist movements, 
especiallv in cubism with Picasso, he has made constructive con- 
tacts with every great art movement of this generation. On a 
foundation of what would be accepted by the most conventional 
as ''solid", he has overlaid these experiences, — but they have all 
been animated by a powerful personal force to which all his varied 
methods seem to be in service. 

This personal fibre which runs through his work is in turn a 
product of the racial and environmental mould in which Rivera 
himself was cast, and it has its cosmic as well as its individual 
nature. He is Hispanic and he is Aztec. He cuts with the twen- 
tieth century edge of a weighty past. 

While Rivera's development has been a constant striving for a 
purification of "painting itself", he seems to share the realiza- 
tion that art has its implications with regard to society. His 
murals are laden with a social imagination and are appreciated 
by the laboring classes of Mexico as generally as by the intellec- 
tuals. In view of the seriousness and integrity of his spirit one 
concedes, whether keeping step with him or not, Rivera's proven 
right to the elbow room which he demands. 

The drawings in the present exhibition, intimate and delicate 
as many of them are, give a paradoxical view of Rivera's strength. 
For the student of technical qualities their sureness of drawing, 
the inevitableness of the thrust of form against form, their 
sensitiveness of touch are of the deepest interest and suggestion. 

g. w. E. 



CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION 

SKETCHES 

i BOWL OF FRUIT 

2 CARICATURE 

3 THE CHIMNEY 

4 FOUR STUDIES FOR CEILING 

5 GIRL AND LILIES 

6 HEAD 

7 HOUSE AND TREES 
8 -i 4 LANDSCAPES 

15 MEXICAN FAMILY 

16 MEXICAN HOUSE 

17 MEXICAN WOMAN 

18 MOTHER AND CHILD 

19 NUDE SKETCH 

20 NUDE WITH APPLE 

21 NUDE WITH BRAIDED HAIR 



CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION 

SKETCHES (CONTINUED) 

22-25 PORTRAITS 

26 RECLINING FIGURE 

27 RECLINING NUDE 

28 THE SARDINE CAN 

29 SKETCH FOR ENTOMBMENT 

30 STILL LIFE 

31 STILL LIFE WITH ARTICHOKE 

32 STILL LIFE WITH COFFEE POT 

33 STILL LIFE WITH GRATER 

34 STILL LIFE WITH VEGETABLES 

35 STREET CORNER 
36-37 STUDIES FOR HEADS 

38 TELEGRAPH POLE 

39 WATER PITCHER 

40 WOMAN AND CHILD 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/exhibitionofsketOOworc